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“Now a man who was lame from birth was being carried to the temple gate called Beautiful, where he was put every day to beg from those going into the temple courts. When he saw Peter and John about to enter, he asked them for money. Peter looked straight at him, as did John.” Acts 3:2-4 (NIV)

Years ago, I was typing on my computer when my kids entered the room. I didn’t pause or look up and kept typing (after all, you’ve got to keep that train of thought going). My kids laughed and said, “How funny, mom! You’re typing about being more social, but you’re ignoring us while you’re on your computer!”

Busted.

Now, I didn’t start writing on papyrus leaves or notepads after that illuminating incident with my kids. But I did start practicing something I call “the pivot.”

This may sound elementary, but how many times have you ignored a spouse, child or friend while you continued texting, answering emails or scrolling through social media? It’s easy for us to become so entranced with our phones and tablets that we don’t notice the people around us. We miss opportunities to minister to our family members and even strangers when our eyes are locked downward.

Here’s how you can practice the pivot — whether you’re texting on your phone or watching TV:

Step 1: When you sense someone approaching you, get ready to perform the pivot.

Step 2: Turn your head away from the screen and toward the incoming human being.

Step 3: Smile and look the person in the eyes. Practice body language which states, “I am listening.”

It’s a good thing the Apostles Peter and John weren’t watching Netflix on their tablets back in the book of Acts. Our key verse introduces us to a man lame from birth, who sat every day to beg at the temple. Verses 3:3-5 say, “When he saw Peter and John about to enter, he asked them for money. Peter looked straight at him, as did John. Then Peter said, ‘Look at us!’ So the man gave them his attention, expecting to get something from them.”

Peter and John didn’t ignore this beggar as most temple-goers did. On the contrary, different translations say they fastened their eyes (KJV), looked intently (NRSV), directed their gaze (ESV), or fixed their eyes (NKJV) at the man. This posture of intense eye contact linked with compassion and the power of God led to the man’s healing!

Peter and John pivoted their attention to help someone in need. In the same way, when we’re walking into church, the workplace or home, it’s a good idea to look up and around. Don’t give priority to your devices. Give priority to the people in your life, offering your full attention to your family members and even noticing if a stranger could use a kind smile.

Today when my kids walk into my home office, I now practice pivoting toward them — even if I have to stop typing mid-sentence. I swivel my chair away from my computer, look them in the eyes and answer whatever questions they have. They are much happier, and so am I. The pivot is my way of communicating to my kids, “You’re more valuable to me than a piece of hardware.”

Let’s never be too busy or consumed with our phones that we stop looking up and seeing. Our phones won’t care if we don’t maintain eye contact. But our loved ones will.

Dear Jesus, Peter and John looked and really saw the beggar in Acts chapter 3. Help me to really see the people in need around me — especially my family members and friends. Help me to pay attention in my relationships and to notice people more, and my phone less. In Jesus’ Name, Amen.

TRUTH FOR TODAY:
Psalm 123:1, “I lift my eyes to you, to you who sit enthroned in heaven.” (NIV)

Psalm 121:1-2, “I lift up my eyes to the mountains — where does my help come from? My help comes from the LORD, the Maker of heaven and earth.” (NIV)

Isaiah 40:26, “Lift up your eyes and look to the heavens: Who created all these? He who brings out the starry host one by one and calls forth each of them by name. Because of his great power and mighty strength, not one of them is missing.” (NIV)

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Step 3: Smile and look the person in the eyes. Practice body language which states, “I am listening. 

The steps reminds me of communication skills, body language is a mix of gestures, postures, and expressions; you use it to engage with people in positive ways. 

What this teaching reminds me of is the nonverbal communication such as: facial expressions, gestures, body language and posture, eye gaze, and appearance. 

It's deep how people can read you or understand your nonvervabl communication. I love the story of how the apostle peter was used to heal the beger at the temple... And the way in which God used peter...  

Bless you Apostle Trina, as I read your comment and remember when God wanted us to learn this study this semester. It remind me of the scripture that says, God takes the foolish things and confound the wise. He will take simple things and make it a Healing ministry. My God to thee. May you have a blessed and Prosperous night on Purpose GN Agape

Here’s how you can practice the pivot — whether you’re texting on your phone or watching TV:

Step 1: When you sense someone approaching you, get ready to perform the pivot.

Step 2: Turn your head away from the screen and toward the incoming human being.

Step 3: Smile and look the person in the eyes. Practice body language which states, “I am listening.”

I need help with all this; to be honest, it’s not about paying attention to the person that enters the room, it’s about the motive. I guess I am a no-nonsense person; I notice a lot that goes on around me, kids, family members, or coworkers; and if it’s not worth my attention, then that’s when I don’t pay attention. I have a sense of need, knowing when it’s necessary, and when it’s not. We picked this up in “boot-camp” in the Army; staying focus; Wrong or right not sure, but…As Apostle Peter and John, this is one of my favorite ones; because they saw deeper than what the man was asking for, they didn't feed into his daily routine, but to the need that will pull him from "himself". Acts 3:6-8 Peter said, “I don’t have a nickel to my name, but what I do have, I give you: In the name of Jesus Christ of Nazareth, walk!” He grabbed him by the right hand and pulled him up. In an instant his feet and ankles became firm. He jumped to his feet and walked. Everyone fed into his routine, the motive, the outer; but they looked deeper. 

Ne'eman i learn to take a moment away from the screen just this last year. I didn't call a pivot i just called it taking a moment. To answer who is infront of me. So I do know what its like to be caught up. I know what its like as well to want someone attention and all you see if the back of th ephone. Or head. Not a good feeling. 

Yes we must focus on ourselves and people around us. We must leave our phones, television, tablets alone and focus on helping others like our children and our friends and strangers because this what God called us to do.

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